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Professor Franzheim

Franzheim makes a small number of appearances over the course of four years. It may be that he was a local magic enthusiast. Note the novelty, in 1861, of the audience lining up to receive a shock from a galvanic battery!

Empire (Sydney) April 27, 1857
GLEBE! GLEBE! GLEBE!! Great Attraction on MONDAY EVENING, April 27th, at the UNIVERSITY HOTEL. The Great Wizard, M.FRANZHEIM, in numberless Tricks of Magic, after which Mr. J. S. WALTON will exhibit his new and attractive Panorama of Sea and Land, or 16,000 miles from Home. First time in Sydney. Doors open at half-past 7, to commence at 8 sharp. Front Seat, 2s.; Back Seats, 1s. Vivat Regina.
Mr J. S. Walton wishes to dispose of his Panorama and all its apparatus. A chance seldom offered to the public. For particulars, apply at No. 2 Lazarus's buildings, Francis-street Glebe; or This Evening at the Hotel.

Sydney Morning Herald, March 5, 1860
TOOGOOD'S SALOON. - Great attraction. - Professor FRANZHEIM, The Wizard of the South, will open his temple of enchantment in conjunction with a talented company. Glees, madrigals, and magic, every evening. Admission free.

[Alfred Toogood was the respectable public of a number of saloons over the years. The Saloon in question was probably the Rainbow Tavern on the corner of King and Pitt Streets, offering both entertainment and accommodation.]

Sydney Morning Herald, March 6, 1860
TOOGOOD'S SALOON. - Immense success of the Wizard of the South. Admission free every evening.

Sydney Morning Herald, March 10, 1860
TOOGOOD'S SALOON. - Novelty TO-NIGHT. - Mr. JOHN TAYLOR, the tenor of the colonies; the Wizard of the South; male and female Vocalists. The only select room in Sydney. Admission Free.

Sydney Morning Herald, May 24, 1860
SYDNEY PHOTOGRAPHIC SALOON, No. 184m Castlereagh-street, within two doors of King-street. Grand Wizard Entertainment THIS EVENING. Professor Franzheim in his incomparable feats of Legerdemain. Come early! Commence at 7. Admission 6d., reserved seats, 1s.

Sydney Morning Herald, April 13, 1861
MANLY BEACH PIER HOTEL. - Novelty Extraordinary. - HERR FRANZHEIM in his novel entertainment of Magic and Mystery, or two hours in Wonder World. Performance to commence at half-past seven. Front seats, 2s.; back seats, 1s.

Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, New South Wales), November 15, 1861
QUEEN'S HOTEL - PROFESSOR FRANSHEIM [sic] THE WIZARD OF THE SOUTH and MR. WEBSTER, COMIC SINGER, Will give their grand DRAWING-ROOM ENTERTAINMENT, at the above Hotel, consisting of - Legerdemain, Galvanic Battery, Singing &c. on SATURDAY and MONDAY EVENING the 16th and 18th INSTANT.
Prices of Admission - Fronst Seats 2s., Back ditto 1s.
Doors open at half-past Seven. Commence at Eight.

Illawarra Mercury, November 19, 1861
Messrs.Franzheim and Webster's first drawing-room entertainment took place on Saturday evening, at the Queen's Hotel, but the attendance, we regret to say, was by no means large, although the charges for admission were fixed to suit the times. Many of the card tricks were unusually good, and the performance throughout of an average character. Pocket handkerchiefs, that were apparently securely fixed in little boxes, were, by the magic wand of the Professor, sent flying into the centre of a two-pound loaf, whilst a clip of corn, by some mysterious process, was changed instanter into a jug of hot coffee. Those, and many other tricks of a similar nature, kept the audience amused for several hours. A few comic-songs by Mr. Webster gave variety tot he programme, and at the close those who thought proper, had an opportunity of receiving a shook from a galvanic battery, of which a great- many availed themselves. The second entertainment took place last night, in the building formerly known as the Keira Theatre, and the attendance was much larger than on Saturday. It is, we believe, the intention of Professor Franzheim, to give another performance this evening, at the same place, and we would recommend those who wish to to witness the marvels of magic, or to derive the benefit of a galvanic shock to make a point of attending.



 

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